How do your days of exposure compare?

The last Utility Information Pipeline analyzed the possible deposit refund or bad debt write-off, based on early results from the Days of Exposure tool featured a few issues ago. If you remember, Days of Exposure is the total number of days of service a customer ends up owing for if they are disconnected for non-payment and never reinstate service.

Last week, a customer asked how their utility’s Days of Exposure compared to others who used the tool, so this issue reports those results. Thus far, 50 people have completed the Days of Exposure tool, 45 of which bill monthly, and those results are represented by the graph below.

The Days of Exposure tool doesn’t ask who is completing the page, but it does log the values for each entry. This means I don’t know which utilities are represented by the results shown here:

Days of exposure

The Days of Exposure for those utilities that bill monthly ranged from 53 days (1.77 billing periods of exposure) to 116 days (3.87 billing periods of exposure). The mean (arithmetic average) is 81.72 and the median (equal number of smaller and larger values) is 79.

Analysis of results

As described in the last issue, 53 Days of Exposure is impressive! I consider anything under 60 to be excellent (in order to complete the delinquent process before billing again). Anything over 70 is generally indicative of areas that can be improved or policies that need to be changed.

Of the 45 responses shown above, three were under 60 days, 11 were between 60 and 70, and 31 were greater than 70, as shown below:

Reasons for a high number of days of exposure can include excessive time between reading meters and mailing bills, the number of days between the due date and when bills are actually delinquent, long periods between the delinquent date and a final notice, and extended time before finally disconnecting for non-payment.

If you haven’t already done so, I invite you to take a minute and click here to calculate your utility’s Days of Exposure to see how your utility performs and determine if you are at risk for a potential bad debt write-off.

Holiday spending money

If you missed it in a previous issue, I’m offering two $50.00 Visa gift cards, one to a new subscriber and one to a current subscriber who refers a new subscriber.If you refer a new subscriber between now and 11:59 pm on Thursday, November 15, you will be entered once for each referral. For referrals from outside your organization, you will be entered twice for each new subscriber. Be sure to remind the people you refer to enter your name on the Referred By line when they complete the subscription form.

Are your days of exposure as low as they could be?

Are your days of exposure as low as they could be? To find out, please give me a call at 919-232-2320 or e-mail me at gsanders@logicssolutions.com to learn how you could benefit from a business review.

Click here to subscribe to my free, bi-weekly email newsletter...

© 2018 Gary Sanders

Why isn’t your security deposit enough?

I’m intrigued by the early results from the Days of Exposure tool that was featured two issues ago. If you remember, Days of Exposure is the total number of days of service a customer ends up owing for if they are disconnected for non-payment and never reinstate service.

I had a suspicion most utilities don’t charge a sufficient security deposit, and the early results have confirmed that. Thus far, 40 people have used the Days of Exposure tool. Of those 40, seven don’t charge a security deposit, so this analysis is based on the remaining 33.

The Days of Exposure tool doesn’t ask who is completing the page, but it does log the values for each entry. This means I don’t know which utilities are represented by the results shown here:

Days of exposure

The Days of Exposure for those utilities that bill monthly ranged from 53 days (1.77 billing periods of exposure) to 116 days (3.87 billing periods of exposure). 53 Days of Exposure might be the lowest I’ve seen over the course of several years of using this calculation. In case you’re wondering, here’s how they arrived at 53 Days of Exposure:

Refunds vs. potential write-offs

As shown in the graph above, seven of the 33 responses (21.2%) charge a security deposit sufficient to cover their potential liability, based on their Days of Exposure. The remaining 26 responses (78.8%) risk potential write-offs ranging from a paltry fifty cents to a whopping $308.33!

Five of the 33 responses are within $10.00 of charging a security deposit that exactly covers their potential liability. Of these, two are refunds – $2.00 and $8.33 – and the other three are potential write-offs of $.50, $1.49, and $6.00. Kudos to these five utilities for doing a stellar job of determining their security deposit!

If you haven’t already done so, I invite you to take a minute and click here to calculate your utility’s Days of Exposure and determine if you are at risk for a potential bad debt write-off.

Holiday spending money

If you missed the last issue, I’m offering two $50.00 Visa gift cards, one to a new subscriber and one to a current subscriber who refers a new subscriber. If you refer a new subscriber between now and 11:59 pm on Thursday, November 15, you will be entered once for each referral. For referrals from outside your organization, you will be entered twice for each new subscriber. Be sure to remind the people you refer to enter your name on the Referred By line when they complete the subscription form.

Are your days of exposure as low as they could be?

Are your days of exposure as low as they could be? To find out, please give me a call at 919-232-2320 or e-mail me at gsanders@logicssolutions.com to learn how you could benefit from a business review.

Click here to subscribe to my free, bi-weekly email newsletter...

© 2018 Gary Sanders